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MEDIUM ÆVUM MONOGRAPHS CATALOGUE

Si sai encor moult bon estoire, chancon moult bone et anciene: Studies in the Text and Context of Old French Narrative in Honour of Joseph J. Duggan
Edited by Sophie Marnette, John F. Levy and Leslie Zarker Morgan
H.S.D.F.
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Professor Joseph J. Duggan, emeritus professor at the University of California (Berkeley) is an eminent scholar of Medieval Studies who has written seminal works on Romance Literatures (and Old French epics in particular). His work ranges from editions of medieval classics such as the Chanson de Roland to articles about troubadours’ lyrics and a monograph on Chrétien de Troyes. Here, fifteen contributions from his former students and colleagues offer literary, narratological, philological, and contextual studies of the texts he has taught and researched over his long and prestigious career.

On Light
Edited by K.P. Clarke and Sarah Baccianti
H.S.O.L.
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The essays assembled in this new volume explore the fascination of the Middle Ages with the mystery of light, and its central role in the period's thought and creativity. Spanning medieval theology, literature, science and material culture, the topics covered include the history of light (and, inseparably, darkness) as a literary figure, from the Latin Bible to Geoffrey Chaucer; theoretical speculations on colour, sight and blindness, and their unexpected fertilization of fields such as poetic imagery; medieval preachers' evocations of light as much more than merely figuring the moral and religious, from St. Simeon in the ninth century to John Fisher in the early sixteenth; indeed the belief that light possessed not only reality but physical materality, as manifested in artefacts such as the Gloucester Candlestick. On Light thereby reveals not only the importance of this phenomenon to diverse aspects of medieval culture, but profound and unremarked ways in which it helped to bind these into a whole.

Medieval and Renaissance Studies on Spain and Portugal in Honour of P. E. Russell
Edited by F.W. Hodcroft, D.G. Pattison, R.D.F. Pring-Mill and R.W. Truman
H.S.R.F.
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The Medieval Anadyomene: A Study in Chaucer's Mythography
Meg Twycross
New Series 01
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A Descriptive Index of the English Lyrics in John of Grimestone's Preaching Book
Edward Wilson
New Series 02
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Liturgy and Drama in the Anglo-Norman Adam
Lynette R. Muir
New Series 03
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Fragments of an Early Fourteenth-Century Guy of Warwick
Edited by Maldwyn Mills and Daniel Huws
New Series 04
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Lyrics of the Red Book of Ossory
Edited by Richard Leighton Greene
New Series 05
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La Bataille Loquifer
Monica Barnett
New Series 06
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Le Voyatge D'Oultremer en Jherusalem de Nompar, Seigneur de Caumont
Edited by Peter S. Noble
New Series 07
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Chaucer and Boccaccio
Piero Boitani
New Series 08
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Christine de Pisan, Ditie de Jehanne d'Arc
Edited by Angus J. Kennedy and Kenneth Varty
New Series 09
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The Tragedy of Knighthood: Origins of the Tannhauser-Legend
J.M. Clifton-Everest
New Series 10
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Nine Verse Sermons by Nicholas Bozon: The Art of a Anglo-Norman Poet and Preacher
Brian J. Levy
New Series 11
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A Descriptive Guide to the Manuscripts of the Prick of Conscience
Robert E. Lewis and Angus McIntosh
New Series 12
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From Legend to Chronicle: The Treatment of Epic Material in Alphonsine Historiography
D. G. Pattison
New Series 13
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The Poet's Art: Literary Theory in Castile c. 1400-60
Julian Weiss
New Series 14
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Studies in Ragnars Saga Lodbrókar and its Major Scandinavian Analogues
Rory McTurk
New Series 15
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Two Late Medieval Love Treatises
Edited by Leslie C. Brook
New Series 16
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De quatuordecim partibus beatitudinis
Edited by Avril Henry and D. A. Trotter
New Series 17
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The Later Versions of Sir Degarre: A Study in Textual Degeneration
Nicolas Jacobs
New Series 18
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The Cursor Mundi: Poem, Texts and Contexts
John J. Thompson
New Series 19
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Studies in the Reception of the Historia Scholastica of Peter Comestor

Maria Sherwood-Smith
New Series 20
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The Historia Scholastica (circa 1170) mingles biblical narrative, Jewish legends, and commentary, and was a popular source of biblical material for authors until the Reformation. Maria Sherwood-Smith gives an introduction to the sources and transmission of the Latin work before investigating its reception in detail in two thirteenth-century German works, the Schwarzwälder Predigten and the Weltchronik of Rudolf von Ems. Briefer analyses of Jacob van Maerlant’s Scolastica and the Historiebijbel van 1360 provide further context. Looking in this way at the different functions the work fulfils for later authors, one discerns a growing awareness of the distinction between it and the text of the Bible. It is suggested that this enhances the Historia Scholastica’s reputation as a safeguard of orthodoxy.

Three Receptaria from Medieval England: The Languages of Medicine in the Fourteenth Century
Edited by Tony Hunt, with Michael Benskin
New Series 21
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The study represents an edition of just over 1500 medical receipts transmitted in three fourteenth-century compendia. The particular interest of these multilingual compilations lies in their date – earlier than most published receipts – and their showing the three languages of medieval England in vigorous and simultaneous use. The language of the Middle English receipts reveals distinctive features which add indispensably to our knowledge of the English language in this period. There are detailed indexes, including a survey of the medical conditions covered, and the notes provide comprehensive references to analogous receipts in other published collections, so shedding light on the processes of compilation and transmission.

Caxton's Morte Darthur: The Printing Process and the Authenticity of the Text
Takako Kato
New Series 22
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Revisiting the fundamental texts of Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte Darthur, the Winchester manuscript and William Caxton’s printed edition, and investigating what happened in Caxton’s workshop are the best ways of discovering what Malory intended to write. This study investigates the irregular use of paraphs and the missing chapter-divisions in Caxton’s Morte, and reveals frequent alterations to it in order to fit his text on the page. It identifies the points at which alterations are most likely to have been made, and suggests that Caxton may have consulted the Winchester manuscript while he was preparing his edition, regularly with regard to textual divisions.

A Sporting Lexicon of the Fifteenth Century: The J. B. Treatise
David Scott-Macnab
New Series 23
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‘A goosehauke for a gentylman; A tersell for the same’ – so asserts one version of the J.B. Treatise, an immensely popular collection of lore and information on a range of topics considered essential to the learning of a gentleman in the later fifteenth century. The J.B. Treatise, which has hitherto been known principally by way of an eclectic medley of filler material in the printed Boke of St Albans (1486), survives in numerous variant forms in twenty-one, mostly unrelated, manuscripts. Its foremost concerns are hawking and hunting, but it differs from other contemporary treatises on these sports by concentrating on terminology rather than praxis. Much of its information is presented in the form of lists of terms, suggesting that it served mainly as a lexical primer rather than a manual of practical instruction. This study – which includes four major variant texts, explanatory notes, a glossary and complete collations of the ‘J.B.’ lists of collective nouns and carving terms – is the first comprehensive survey of all known versions of the J.B. Treatise, whose contents will be of interest to English medievalists in a range of disciplines, including history, literature and language studies.

Estoria delos Godos: Critical edition and Introduction
Edited and introduced by Aengus Ward
New Series 24
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A late thirteenth-century Castilian translation of Ximenes de Rada’s De rebus Hispaniae, this edited and annotated text is accompanied by an introduction which places the translation within the ideological and cultural milieu of the Hispanic nobility, reflecting their concerns for the good government of the kingdom. The book will be of interest to all those concerned with Spanish history, European noble culture, and medieval translation into the vernacular.

Studies in the Metre of Alliterative Verse
Ad Putter, Judith Jefferson & Myra Stokes
New Series 25
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The volume provides a comprehensive study of the metre of the unrhymed poems of the Alliterative Revival. It includes detailed analysis and discussion of line endings, alliterative patterning, historical grammar, the relationship between linguistic stress and beat, and presents new discoveries regarding the metrical rules of the a-verse.
Readers interested in the metre and textual criticism of alliterative poems, such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Siege of Jerusalem and the Alexander fragments, will find this monograph 'an outstanding, scholarly, assured and important work' (Ruth Kennedy, Royal Holloway, University of London).


For editors of alliterative verse, this book is essential reading'. Susanna Fein, Speculum, lxxxv (2010), pp. 457 - 458.
'A model of meticulousness and sensible argument'. Thomas Bredehoft, Review of English Studies, lx (2009), pp. 802 - 804.

Three Anglo-Norman Treatises on Falconry
Edited by Tony Hunt
New Series 26
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These hitherto unedited treatises on hawking, dealing with nurture, training, and medical treatments, are products of the thirteenth century and clearly indicate Anglo-Norman’s connections with aristocratic culture and its status as a worthy vehicle of knowledge beside Latin, from which the texts are derived. They represent an interesting repository of specialist, technical vocabulary and make a valuable contribution to historical lexicology. The Introduction explains the terminology and training procedures which figure in the texts. The edition also contains an unpublished Latin text for comparison. Full glossaries are provided for all Anglo-Norman texts.

The Anglo-Norman Amys e Amilioun: the Text of Karlsruhe MS. 345 (Durlac 38)
Edited by John Ford
New Series 27
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Although largely forgotten today, the story of Amys and Amilioun was one of the most popular legends of the Middle Ages. Initially recounted in Latin, it quickly passed into most European vernacular languages. It has therefore rightly drawn the attention of both single-language specialists and comparativists interested in medieval languages and literature. The Anglo-Norman version of the story found in Karlsruhe, MS. 345 is edited here for the first time. The text presented is significantly different from the other Anglo- Norman versions of the tale, and in these differences it often shows a particular affinity with the Middle English redactions. It therefore provides something of a ‘missing link’ between the French-language tradition and the Middle English accounts, as well as between the continental and insular versions of the legend.

Estoire de l’Evangile (Dublin: Christ Church Cathedral, MS. C6.1.1)
Edited by Brent A. Pitts
New Series 28
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The Estoire de l’Evangile offers a life of Christ, ‘sa vie e sa doctrine, ses miracles, sa Passion, sa Resurection e sa Assencion’. The author of the Estoire deeply comprehends the drama of the Gospels, rendering their substance forcefully, faithfully and with admirable dramatic skill. An important and heretofore overlooked witness in the gospel harmony tradition, Estoire offers a few readings that may echo the earliest Diatessarons. Meanwhile, all evidence points to the conclusion that the Estoire de l’Evangile is the long-sought ‘Old French’ exemplar of the well known Pepysian Gospel Harmony (Cambridge: Magdalene College, MS. Pepys 2498).

How to Correct the Sacra Scriptura? Textual Criticism of the Bible between the Twelfth and Fifteenth Century
Cornelia Linde
New Series 29
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This study deals with Latin texts from the twelfth to the fifteenth century that discuss the emendation of the Latin Bible. After consideration of the medieval terminology for different versions of the Bible, it offers an overview of the transmission of the Latin Bible in the Middle Ages and its medieval editions. A survey of the cult of Jerome precedes an investigation of statements by textual critics about the status of the Vulgate and other versions of the Bible. The main body of the work is dedicated to the authors’ views of the textual tradition by examining their statements on the status of Hebrew, Greek and Latin manuscripts for the emendation of the Latin Bible. Finally, this study explores the struggle between consuetudo and veritas and the role of grammar in the emendation of the Latin Bible.

Cornelia Linde studied Medieval and Classical Latin and Auxiliary Sciences of History at the universities of Göttingen, Bologna and Freiburg im Breisgau. She holds an MA in Cultural and Intellectual History, 1300–1650, and a PhD in Combined Historical Studies from the Warburg Institute, University of London. Previously a post-doctoral Fellow at University College, London, she now holds a Research Fellowship at The German Historical Institute, London.

Humanism in Fifteenth-Century Europe
Edited by David Rundle
New Series 30
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This volume brings together a series of scholars to provide a stimulating overview of Italian Renaissance humanism across Europe in the fifteenth century. The ten chapters cover Italy (Stephen Milner), Greeks and Renaissance Humanism (John Monfasani), the German-speaking lands (John L. Flood), Poland (Jacqueline Glomski), Hungary (Cristina Neagu), Castile (Jeremy Lawrance), France (Craig Taylor), Scotland (Thomas Rutledge), England (Daniel Wakelin) and close with a thematic discussion of the 'Structures of Contacts' (David Rundle; this chapter is available for download). In addition, there is a Biographical Appendix of the quattrocento Italian humanists discussed in the volume (by Oren Margolis and David Rundle).

This monograph will be essential reading for both students and scholars of the intellectual cultures of the later Middle Ages. It is published alongside the electronic fourth edition of Roberto Weiss's classic Medium Ævum monograph, Humanism in England during the Fifteenth Century.

Misera Hispania: Jews and Conversos in Alonso de Espina’s Fortalitium fidei
Rosa Vidal Doval
New Series 31
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Fortalitium fidei is one of the central texts in the controversy surrounding the religious and social status of conversos in fifteenth-century Castile. This monograph provides a close analysis of the text itself and contextualizes this study through comparison with pro-converso texts and with reference to Alonso de Espina’s career as an Observant Franciscan. After an outline of the development of the converso problem, it offers a biography of Espina and a discussion of the context of production of Fortalitium fidei. There is then a discussion of three works of theology in defence of conversos: Alonso de Cartagena’s Defensorium unitatis christianae, Juan de Torquemada’s Tractatus contra madianitas et ismaelitas, and Alonso de Oropesa’s Lumen ad revelationem gentium. The rest of the work is detailed reading of Fortalitium fidei, with chapters on the image of the fortress, the treatment of Jews and Judaism, and of conversos. This volume addresses the extent and nature of the debate about conversos, the development of models of genealogical exclusion, and the role of Espina and his text in the ending of religious plurality in Spain.   

Ulrich Fuetrer's Parzival: Material and Sources
James Boyd
Original Series 01
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Des Grantz Geanz: An Anglo-Norman poem
Georgine E. Brereton
Original Series 02
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Courtoisie in Anglo-Norman Literature
C. B. West
Original Series 03
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Humanism in England during the Fifteenth Century
Roberto Weiss. Edited by David Rundle and A. J. Lappin
Original Series 04
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The Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature first published Roberto Weiss's Humanism in England in 1941, with subsequent editions in 1957 and 1967. The author died in 1969 but, even forty years after his death, his first monograph remains an essential guide to its subject. The Society is now making it available on-line, in a new and updated edition.

The on-line edition presents Weiss's text with his own addenda incorporated into the footnotes. In addition, the text is annotated with new addenda, providing updated bibliography, and corrigenda. There is also an introduction, detailing the development of Weiss's work and the influence it has had, by David Rundle. He also provides us with an appendices of previously unpublished original texts and of manuscript descriptions.

The text of Weiss's monograph appeared on-line in instalments, uploaded at regular intervals between October 2009 and July 2010, with the Editor's Introduction being posted in September 2010. These have been supplemented with Appendix I, uploaded in January 2012. The final on-line instalment will be Appendix II (Manuscript Descriptions) which will appear in early 2015. Each section is in pdf format. Weiss's text appears in an 'integrated' presentation, placing the new addenda as marginalia to the pages of Weiss's text. For the first instalment, a 'clean' presentation was also tested, where marginal sigla on the text-pages directing the reader to the addenda which appear at the end of the file, separately paginated.

All files should be considered to be in 'pre-print' format and feedback is invited, providing comment or further references; please contact the Society.

The Digressions in Beowulf
Adrien Bonjour
Original Series 05
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Gothic Studies
G. W. S. Friedrichsen
Original Series 06
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More Poemes de Transition: Notes on the Rondeaux of a Taylorian Manuscript
Kathleen Chesney
Original Series 07
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